Elio Delgado Legon

The Antonio Maceo monument in Havana. Photo: Juan Suarez

HAVANA TIMES — Assuming openly counter-revolutionary stances or disguising themselves as left-wingers who claim to want to save the revolution, some people criticize everything in Cuba.

They criticize the country’s health system, which is held up as an example for the rest of the world and has been praised by the highest health authorities in the UN. They criticize the massive rallies held on May Day, admired by all foreigners who witness and take part in them, because the workers do not demonstrate holding banners demanding social and labor reforms, as is the case nearly everywhere else in the world.

Quite simply, Cuban workers, even the increasingly fewer workers who have low salaries, put forth their complaints and express their needs at the appropriate places, because they know their opinions are taken into account and that, as the country’s economy begins to recover, worker salaries and pensions will gradually rise, because the revolutionary government is just as interested in seeing wages fulfil the needs of worker and their families as the workers themselves.

These critics refer to the Economic and Social Policy Guidelines of the Party and Revolution derisively, when these 313 guidelines were analyzed and discussed by the entire population and the thousands of suggestions made were collected, before the document was approved at the 6th Party Congress. This Congress, whether our enemies like it or not, represented the entire working people, save, of course, for that small group of people who disagree with everything and only support those measures dictated from the north.

The guidelines, however, have been praised more than once by personalities who sympathize with Cuba and visit us, as a very comprehensive plan that will push the country’s economy forward, despite the international economic crisis that is affecting all countries and the economic, commercial and financial blockade that Cuba has suffered for more than 50 years, a blockade the enemies of the revolution never mention.

To go against the revolution, they support anarchist positions. Yes, anarchist positions, in the 21st century. Positions that call for the abolition of the State and all power and the free association of individuals, that is to say, anarchy.

Reina Street in Centro Habana. Photo: Juan Suarez

Another issue criticized by these individuals is our electoral system, which they call anti-democratic. What they propose is nothing other than a constituent assembly to draft a new constitution, tailored to their wishes.

However, they forget that the constitution which governs the country was also analyzed and discussed with the population, as is the case with all important documents and laws, and that thousands of proposals were collected and incorporated into the document, which was later subjected to a direct and secret vote – a veritable referendum which revealed people’s support for the revolution, for the constitution was approved by more than 97 percent of voters and there is no reason to do away with it.

They also want to change the electoral law to go back to a multi-party system, as though that were the guarantee of democracy. The multi-party system and its politicking are well known by our people, at least those of us who suffered that stage of our history. What a multi-party system guarantees, rather, is the opportunism of those who want to control the State’s and people’s resources and have no interest in the wellbeing of society. It would be tantamount to returning to the past, which is what the ultra-Right up north and all of the enemies of the revolution want. That is why they criticize everything, to confuse the youngest with their siren-songs.


Elio Delgado Legon

Elio Delgado-Legon: I am a Cuban who has lived for 80 years, therefore I know full well how life was before the revolution, having experienced it directly and indirectly. As a result, it hurts me to read so many aspersions cast upon a government that fights tooth and nail to provide us a better life. If it hasn’t fully been able to do so, this is because of the many obstacles that have been put in its way.

54 thoughts on “The Enemies of the Revolution

  • Classic Gomezz observation. Crude as usual, but undoubtedly based on his study of such matters.

  • Au contraire, mon frère,
    As a democrat I feel that everyone has an absolute democratic right to their own stupid opinions.
    What they do not have is a right to manufacture their own facts .
    My ongoing mission in life is to both validate and/or invalidate my thinking on various matters of deep interest
    to me .
    I invite you to demonstrate with solid proof i.e. fact where you are correct and where I am incorrect because that is my modus operandi .
    There is nothing I love more than being shown where I am wrong and I mean this sincerely .
    If you could consistently prove me wrong, then I’d be the idiot wouldn’t I ?
    Likewise, I will stay on point and chew on subject matter I enjoy discussing… endlessly and/or until resolution of the point of contention.
    If I post a fact and it is rejected out of hand, without fact-checking by my debate opponent and it is something I am dead sure about I feel entitled, at that point, to regard the opponent as an unthinking clod afraid to test his/her own beliefs.
    I fully understand that fear because I see a lot of it in what Rush Limbaugh calls the “low information” U.S. public who cannot back up their beliefs with anything factually solid.
    When confronted with info that would undeniably show them to be incorrect, they turn a blind eye towards that info and retreat ever deeper into the thinking they have come to be comfortable with.
    This has been borne out by several large studies .
    Look , I’m a crabby old man ….so deal with the facts I present rather than the distracting manner in which they are presented .
    I’m just looking for information .

  • John, I give an opinion but in the long run, the Cuban people must decide which direction to go. I no longer am a revolutionary and in fact believe that systems, as in political entities and economies, need to change continuously.
    My faith is not my generation, 50-70 year olds but the 14-26 years olds in all countries. What changed my mind was Ireland’s pro gay marriage vote. As an Irish citizen, raised 100% Irish, this was revolutionary. The peace treaty with the North and South of Ireland was also mind boggling. I’m not too far from your thinking but miles apart as well.

  • I’m confused. Is this article a sarcasm? Elio, do you really believe our opinions are taken into account? Just a few examples: Labour code. Although it was wildly discussed at work places, none of the aspects raised by the people were taken into account when approving the new one i.e. to reduce week hours to 40, to formally encourage all employers to compensate employees for the over time; to have equal opportunities for the gay community, to reduce the mandatory retirement age. Constitution: unless it is approved by secret and direct vote it doesn’t count, I was one of the more than 8 million people who signed at the CDR for the amendment and I’m fully against it. The union, do you really believe the CTC represents and stand for our workers needs. Name one Cuban who believes electricity rates are affordable. Name one Cuban who believe telecommunication rates, rents, vehicles… are affordable for a common worker…POR FAVOR!

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