Irina Pino

Bob Dylan.  Photo: wikipedia.org
Bob Dylan. Photo: wikipedia.org

HAVANA TIMES — In 1985, at the end of a party, a friend invited me over to listen to a Bob Dylan album. At first, the music surprised me. Then I felt that it was something different. The songs, played with a guitar and a harmonica, were endless.

I was very young and, even though I wasn’t able to capture the message clearly, I sensed there was something unique in Dylan’s way of singing, with that voice that someone once said sounded like filing paper being scratched. For me, it is a voice that breaks with the familiar, which can travel long distances, hide and leap at you, as well as flee from us, like a playful and surreptitious animal that mocks everyone.

I immediately asked my friend to translate his songs, aware as I was of the poetry behind them, that marvelous imagination he relied on to tell stories, mixing the human with the symbolic and often speaking about simple folk, the icons of literature, cinema and religion. Listening to his pieces was like being treated to a feast of creativity.

With his words, Dylan expresses what others need to hear. He has the gift of wisdom and the irreverence needed to mock power. In his love songs, he describes delicate feelings and pain, and many of them evince a refined form of irony.

Unconditional followers from different generations must follow him in the endless tour he has been on for years. I suppose seeing and listening to this living legend is a privilege for those who can make such a dream come true.

Todd Haynes’ 2007 film I’m Not There, recreates the many lives of Dylan. It is one of the most original tributes to the artist I’ve seen. To portray him as several different characters (and even a black child who flees from his home town with a guitar on a train, to sing at different towns), as the film does, is in some way to give form to Dylan’s alter-ego, Woody Guthrie, the folk musician and composer who became an emblem of protest songs. The child’s journey is Bob’s escape from his native town.

The dissection of each of these different Dylans – his loves, his personal tragedies – reveal the structure of a man who still has a lot to show us, who lights up a spark of the surreal within the real.

The singer-songwriter, who has experimented with a broad range of genres, including folk music, rock and roll and blues, has recorded an album with his own versions of songs by Frank Sinatra. In this connection, he admits that “He is the mountain. That is the mountain you have to climb, even if you only get part of the way there.”

It would have been more conclusive to say: “I am a daring mountain-climber. I am going to climb that mountain.”

Dylan also defines himself as an elderly man, conscious of the fact that passion fits better with youth.

That sense of spiritual ease, might it not be another trick to keep us interested in his life and music?

It’s best not to take him literally, unpredictable as he is.


Irina Pino

Irina Pino: I was born in the middle of shortages in those sixties that marked so many patterns in the world. Although I currently live in Miramar, I miss the city center with its cinemas and theaters, and the bohemian atmosphere of Old Havana, where I often go. Writing is the essential thing in my life, be it poetry, fiction or articles, a communion of ideas that identifies me. With my family and my friends, I get my share of happiness.

2 thoughts on “About Bob Dylan

  • Irina, you seem to assume that Dylan was appreciated by all. Sadly, sorry to burst your bubble but he’s seen by many as ‘wrist slashing’ music. Furthermore, unlike a fine wine, he has got worse as he has got older.

  • I can remember tuning in (on one of those console radios that were about four feet high with a huge -(nice bass tone) speaker ) to Boston University’s radio station way down on the FM band and listening to a Saturday morning folk music program .
    They were playing Bob Dylan and I was digging it .
    This would be around 1960 ?
    My two sisters were making all sorts of faces and asking what in the world I was listening to.
    Of course, in later years my younger sister had a huge poster of Bob Dylan up in her house and her first child was calling the picture ” Bob Dinna” before she could really speak well..
    He could have been a poet laureate had he stuck to his poetic imagery rather than go into music and entertaining.
    “…..’Take me disappearing through the smoke rings of my mind….”
    through the foggy reels of time ”
    Yes indeed.
    Now , however, he’s a bit of a schmuck with his religious bent.
    IMO

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *