Luis Rondon Paz

Coordinadora de ANSOC Boyeros con material educativo
Coordinadora de ANSOC Boyeros con material educativo

HAVANA TIMES — On May 15th this year, the National Association for the Deaf “ANSOC” invited me to give a talk about Sexually Transmitted Disease “STDs” at the Muncipal Committee’s hall in Havana’s Boyeros municipality.

As a speaker and civil rights activist, the opportunity to share my knowledge with this group of people was truly unique and enlightening. And I think that the feeling was mutual amongst the people who received my message, who came to empower themselves as citizens within Cuban society. Of course, this was all thanks to the help of an interpreter.

It’s important to add that I’ve been working with this minority group -who has to face communication barriers on a daily basis as well as being targets of discrimination-, for over a year and a half. Unfortunately, in addition to the aforementioned, this group isn’t paid any attention to on the TV. Let me point out that in the majority of official events which are broadcasted, sign language interpreters are never present. I hope that this problem will be fixed soon.

I’d like to share with you some photos from my talk with this small community of deaf people.

Click on the thumbnails below to view all the photos in this gallery. On your PC or laptop, you can use the directional arrows on the keyboard to move within the gallery. On cell phones use the keys on the screen.


Luis Rondón

Luis Rondon Paz: Activist, Queer, computer scientist, actor, photographer, student and apprentice journalist. Originally from Santiago de Cuba. I believe that people are life projects in constant transformation. I am consistent and responsible for my actions, committed to just causes and a lover of good deeds. Today I write about Cuba in exile, free of psychological torture and persecution of the Cuban dictatorship.

One thought on “When Making a Difference Really Counts

  • I have a group of deaf friends in Havana and it’s always mind blowing to show up at one of their rockin’ parties with no music blaring and mostly utter silence.

    It’s a gas to see a couple of dozen Cubans “shouting” at each other with sign language only. It’s kinda refreshing.

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