More on Violence

Irina Echarry

I’ve closely read everything that Havana Times has published on the issue of violence (which has been quite a bit) as well as the comments made by readers.  I myself have written about the issue on several occasions, and I continue to think that it’s necessary to do something to prevent its noxious impact and its worsening.

While attempting to better understand this situation, I began to think a little more seriously about it, and perhaps I should add that I tried to put my passions and emotions to one side.  Up to now I’ve advocated the radical elimination of violence, but I’ve come to realize that this isn’t possible because the idea of annihilating it at its roots, so abruptly, is in itself a violent idea.

So, what can be done?

Violence is something natural in human beings.  The act of birth is violent, despite the degree to which we’ve improved it.  Even the formation of an embryo in a woman’s stomach —though we view the fact of giving life as being something beautiful— leads to implicit violence (the living being must feed from its mother).

Going further, the very idea and the act of bringing a life into the world, without being able to ask it whether it wants to or not, is the height of violence and imposition.  Therefore we should not look at it as something that other people practice but as something that influences us all.

On the contrary, I believe that when we assume that we’re violent or that we can be violent at any given moment, we should begin to think seriously about how much we win or lose using violence or (something exceedingly difficult) not employing it.

If we are tied to it; if we experience it daily; if we understand its causes and consequences, then we could learn how to accept it as something natural and not struggle against it, because to struggle against anything or anyone is a violent act.

We would have to learn how to manage it so that it didn’t harm us, to judge it in a subtle way when that’s necessary (for the time being it’s sometimes necessary),and especially for us to learn and teach how to love one another and respect each other to see how we can get along.

Irina Echarry

Irina Echarry: I enjoy reading, going to the movies and spending time with my friends. Many of the people I love are dead, or are no longer in Cuba. I will do my best to transmit my thoughts, ideas or worries via these pages so you can get to know me. I will give an idea of my age, since it helps explain certain things. I’m over thirty-five, and I think that’s enough information. I don’t have any children yet, or nieces or nephews. There are days when I transform myself into a child with no age at all in order to see life from another angle. It helps me break the monotony and survive in this strange world.



One thought on “More on Violence

  • Irina:

    Once again i SEND CREDIT to you..It is a nice piece and clearly well thought out..
    Usually, i have something to say about all lthings, however, this time i am simply giving yopu props..as i move on. NO! i have not been quieted its just that some things make more sense than others…UNLESS SOMEONE PUTS THIO\ER HANDS ON ME? LOL

    GOOD ARTICLE

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Photo of the Day

Photo of the Day
Picture 1 of 2

Veterans Cemetery, Tennessee, USA.  By Phillip Gregg (USA).  Camera: Nikon D810

Submit your pictures to our Photo of the Day section
You don’t have to be a professional photographer, just send an image (in black and white or color), with a photo caption indicating where it was taken (city and country), type of camera or cell you used, and a small description about it.
Note: it is better for our format if you send horizontal orientation pictures. Even square will work but vertical is a problem.
Send your picture with your name and birth country, or where you reside, to this email address: yordaguer@gmail.com