The Embarrassment of Being Invited in Your Own Home

Rosa Martinez

Figuring things out. Photo: Juan Suarez

HAVANA TIMES — Only a real Cuban will understand this article; only somebody who has lived in Cuba over the past 20 years will know what I’m talking about.

How happy a family is when a relative arrives home who risked their life in violent Venezuela or their health in the African continent rife with exotic diseases.

How good it is when a son, brother, cousin returns, who has been living in Europe for a decade but doesn’t forget their family and comes loaded with the most unimaginable objects every year, things that only a Cuban would transport from one country to another.

Not to mention relatives in the United States, the ones who never stop feeling nostalgia for their beloved land, who feel so close yet so far. These are the same people who have maintained entire families for decades, providing impossible luxuries on an island that is becoming increasingly expensive.

How grateful we are for a simple change of clothes, which might be the simplest thing over there, but is almost a luxury here. Not to mention medicines which are sometimes in shortage, or only exist in pharmacies for tourists which nobody knows who thought to invent these, but they continue to widen the gap between the most powerful and ordinary Cubans every day.

But how embarrassing it is too when a friend from any country decides to bring a little something to help any Cuban family out, as they know that wages barely cover food expenses and “here a pair of tennis shoes don’t cost anything, we’re doing this from the heart,” like I was told once.

Embarrassment yes, and not because we don’t have things, because a hungry man can’t feel ashamed of their hunger if they work honestly every day, just like a sick person can’t feel ashamed of their disease, because nobody wishes for that.

Shame can even come with a damn cell phone (who invented this crap? I ask myself every day) because, in order to use it regularly, you need to ask this person that lives on the other side of the world, “could you send me a top up please.”

If I work all year round, I even have two jobs (aside from my domestic job which I don’t earn wages for), why is it then that I have to bother a relative, a friend or a simple acquaintance to help me out with a service which stopped being a luxury for the rest of the world centuries ago and is now an essential item.

Embarrassment comes with having to accept help from real friendships and knowing that they are sharing what is theirs out of the goodness of their hearts. This unsettling feeling can become anger, because what we really want to do is give instead of receive (at least sometimes) because we would like to invite others instead of being invited in our own homes…


Rosa Martínez

Rosa Martinez: I am another Havana Times contributing writer, university professor and mother of two beautiful and spoiled girls, who are my greatest joy. My favorite passions are reading and to write and thanks to HT I’ve been able to satisfy the second. I hope my posts contribute towards a more inclusive and more just Cuba. I hope that someday I can show my face along with each of my posts, without the fear that they will call me a traitor, because I’m not one.

13 thoughts on “The Embarrassment of Being Invited in Your Own Home

  • Although I think that Dr. Jones and I differ politically, he is correct that both China and Vietnam have made massive steps forward economically by adopting capitalism and that Fidel Castro as a Stalinist type communist heavily criticized Vietnam for so doing.
    The Castro regime and the Communist Party of Cuba are locked in to antiquated Marxism/Leninism 19th century constipated thinking. “Change” is not possible! Diaz-Canel has committed himself to “continuity” of the Castro thinking – he knows nothing else! Barack Obama’s visit to Cuba illustrated the depth of the problem, when only seven days following his televised speech at the Alicia Alonso Theatre, both Granma and State TV published a letter purported to be by the failing ( maybe mentally failed) Fidel Castro repudiating any idea of compromise about anything.
    As long as the current communist regime in Cuba retains power and control, Stalin lives!

    In 1921 Lenin said: “The victory of the workers is impossible without a temporary worsening of their situation.”
    In 1922, Lenin purchased a Rolls Royce car for his own use for eighteen hundred pounds sterling.

    So nothing is different in Cuba, Raul and Fidel with their fleet of cars, Fidel with his two island retreat and yacht Aquarama II, Raul with his diplomatic image change to hand-tailored suits and silk ties!
    Being a Jesuit, Fidel adopted as policy the Biblical quote: ”Unto those that hath, shall be given.”

  • Thank you for sharing your thoughts.
    Esthela

  • Having my closest family members in Guantanamo as Rosa, I understand every bit of her feelings and needs. Every time I visit Cuba my heart breaks because of the unnecessary pain and suffering the people endure, for reasons most people in and out Cuba do not understand.

    Cuba imposed tight military measures, freedom of speech and movement in 1960 to protect itself from undeniable outside aggression of every type. Guantanamo suffered most than the rest of the country because of its proximity with GITMO. What is sad and devastating, are measures such as keeping Caimanera and boqueron off-limits and having thousands of men guarding the periphery of GITMO for a war that fortunately has not materialized in half a century, these decisions have remained frozen in time and Guantanamo is today the most backward, forgotten and undeveloped area in Cuba.

    Up until 1959, thousands of Cubans worked on GITMO, hundreds of US service men lived with their families in Guantanamo and unfortunately US service men on shore leave, turned Guantanamo into the largest Red Light District in Cuba.

    For that reason, some of our readers may recall my position of being different from most since day one, which has been twofold, to help my community through humanitarian support with medicine, medical and handicap supplies, environmental projects, school pen pals, feeding programs in church and nursing homes, leading tours of predominantly Afro Americans and Caribbean citizens living in the US to Cuba, enable them to establish links and bond with their peers and common history.

    I have avoided confronting both the Cuban and American government actions and choose to highlight their failures every time I can.

    My recent visit to Singapore, Thailand, Viet Nam and Hong Kong restored my faith, hopes and conviction that change, development and happiness is possible. Please read in HT, The future of Cuba lies in Asia HT 130762 and A Doi Moi or Renovation for Cuba, HT 131931.

    Having experienced the human tragedy on both side of the Florida Straits derived from material needs in Cuba and the anxiety of parents in the United States where no one can assure parents their kids will be returning from school, or millions of retirees are barely surviving on fixed income, the lack of health insurance and addictions plaguing the nation or the endless police brutality against Black and Latino youths with impunity demonstrates, we ought to find a middle ground in which, the basic needs of Cubans are met, while thousands of idle or underutilized educators, healthcare providers, sports and cultural instructors, can educate our kids in gun and drug free Cuba.

    Nor should we accept without trying, that millions of acres of undeveloped lands remain idle in Cuba, while millions of retirees can barely survive and are afraid to go to the grocery store.

    Viet Nam has thought me important lesson on how they overcome the horrors that China, Japan, France and the United States inflicted on their people. We too, can begin to look forward without forgetting the past.

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