Sandinista Militants Want Revenge against Rebel Public Employees

The gathering of Ortega supporters in Masaya on Sunday July 22. Photo: el19digital.com

As polarization in Nicaragua continues to rise with President Ortega and VP Murillo calling their detractors “demons sent by the Devil”, their worked-up supporters want action against such evil.

 

HAVANA TIMES – Amid the current crisis in Nicaragua, one of the recommendations of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights to the Ortega government is to respect and fully guarantee the population’s right to protest, express themselves freely, assemble peacefully, and participate in the movements they choose to.

The current policy of forcing public employees to partake in pro-government partisan political rallies is a clear violation of worker’s rights. Either not participating when “asked” nor taking part in opposition protests can mean a loss of their jobs in reprisal.

As polarization in Nicaragua continues to rise with President Ortega and VP Murillo calling their detractors “demons sent by the Devil”, their worked-up supporters want action against such evil.

The top Party official at the meeting, Guiomar Irias.

Sunday, in a meeting of Sandinistas in Masaya “to ratify their support for the government led by Commander Daniel Ortega and Comrade Rosario Murillo”, “hundreds of militants told the top Party official at the meeting, Guiomar Irias, that the government should fire the hundreds of ‘coup supporters’ employed by government institutions.”

The revelation reported on the government website el19digital.com, shows that despite the threats of retaliation and the loss of their jobs, a growing number of public employees are no longer willing to be used to fill government rallies.

With the economy in a sharp downturn, Irias told those present: “you can be sure that the Sandinista Front led by commander Daniel Ortega is working to continue the model of alliances that had brought development and progress to the country.” She was referring to the mutually beneficial relationship that the government and private employers had prior to the protests that began in mid-April, when everything changed.

Meanwhile, at the same assembly, FSLN Militant Luis Vasquez complained about being “kidnapped” for 82 days in the Masaya neighborhood of Monimbo that had been taken over by the anti-Ortega protesters. He called to “bring to justice the intellectuals that made homemade weapons and Molotov cocktails.”

 

 


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