Photo Feature by Rosa Martinez

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HAVANA TIMES — According to a report published by the International Labor Association (ILO), over 10 million children work worldwide as domestic servants in dangerous conditions and, sometimes, even slave-like conditions.

The report explains that these young children, over 70% are girls, clean, iron, cook, do the gardening, collect water and look after other children and care for the elderly in the homes of a third party or employer, and are vulnerable to physical, psychological and sexual abuse.

Furthermore, they live in abusive working conditions and are isolated from their families. They are also exposed to dangerous environments and illegal activities, such as drug trafficking and prostitution.

Although we can find more than one child walking the streets here in Cuban cities, maybe a few of them beg, mainly to tourists, or sell something for a few cents, but we can definitely say that our children don’t need to work in order to put food on the table nor to satisfy their most basic needs. If our social system has a priority, it’s our children.

Now that the summer vacation is around the corner, we’ll show you some photos of Guantanamo youngsters at work, the future of our province.

Click on the thumbnails below to view all the photos in this gallery. On your PC or laptop, you can use the directional arrows on the keyboard to move within the gallery. On cell phones use the keys on the screen.

30 thoughts on “Guantanamo, Cuba Children at Work

  • Really? I thought you had to be seeking asylum or trained in a skill Cuba needs. Do you mean that really wanting to be there is enough of a reason to be granted residency? Surely it’s a lot harder than that.
    I know you are being sarcastic, but I’ll appreciate any info you or others have..

  • Out of interest. From the pictures above, what percentage would you say were black.

  • 2002 Census 11.2 million

    2012 Census 11.1 million

  • You will relieved to know Ben that my contributions to these pages are limited to being made when I am not at home in Cuba from where I am unable to contribute. As I spend the majority of my time at home, I hope you will excuse me for contributing when I have the luxury of being able to do so.
    Regarding your not caring about the obvious manipulation of census statistics by the Castro regime or their reasons and purpose I understand that for you as a casual observer it is unimportant. My views are driven by those of the many Cubans who are not allowed to publicly express theirs.

  • This is certainly a bigger issue for you than it is for me. I don’t really care what the reported percentage is. I think you should get a hobby. You’ve got too much time on your hands.

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