Fears of the Economic Changes

Regina Cano

It might not be so different, because each change of this magnitude —which occurs suddenly— is digested by the population as the days pass…when the mechanism is put into operation and the rules and of the game become evident.

There’s a rumor spreading in the streets of Havana.  Fear is setting in as a result of the recent announcement concerning the planned mass lay off of Cuban workers – a half million within six months.

It’s getting more and more difficult to survive.  Burglary, pickpocketing and mugging are making their appearances in the capital.

At least in my neighborhood, near where I live, new spaces or mini-stations have been set up for self-employed workers.

For many locals, this symptom seems to portend an avalanche in crime that could hit everyday citizens, with those activities resulting from the projected high rate of residual unemployment.

Or, perhaps it will be part of the “solutions” to control the new financial relationships to be established, since supposedly diverse and numerous jobs for self-employed workers will be established (in addition to the unofficial black market jobs that will undoubtedly persist).

It might not be so different, because each change of this magnitude —which occurs suddenly— is digested by the population as the days pass…when the mechanism is put into operation and the rules of the game become evident.

Obviously, the gangsterism stemming from economic shortages means a decline in the security of most of the population, because periods of shortage sometimes cost blood.  These turn into times when people’s wardrobes and other indicators reveal the potential liquidity of their pockets.

It’s possible that a virtual ban on the wearing of gold jewelry in public will return, along with the end of people confidently carrying cell phones hung from their waist or neck.

Unfortunately, it seems like the changes will be welcomed and that people will have to get home early and stay there, because the prediction is that the streets of Havana are going to get hotter.

Regina Cano

Regina Cano: I have lived my entire life in Havana, Cuba – the island from which I’ve still never left, and which I love. I was born on September 9, and my parents chose my name out of superstition, but my mother raised me outside the religion professed by her family. I studied accounting and finance at the University of Havana, a profession that I’m not engaged in for the time being, and that I substituted for doing crafts, some ceramics, and studying a little English and about painting. Ah! – concerning my picture: I identify with Rastafarian principles, but I am not one of them. I wear this cap from time to time, but I assure you I just didn't have a better picture.



5 thoughts on “Fears of the Economic Changes

  • Regina Cano
    I read your article. I have lots of compassion for the Cuban People.
    Sincerely,

    Robert Cowdery
    Spokane, WA

    Reply
  • Man Regina, this piece though brief carries the weight of a novel. What I mean is that it paints a picture of the current Cuban reality with urgency and a grim fervor. Although these are not times to be taken lightly, you my dear have the beginnings of an important investigative narrative, short novel, scenario, or theatrical piece. In America things are very bad esp. for the silent majority (underclass) and these scenes are happening daily ignored by the watchful eye of the national news media. In my town, a young couple was apprehended for calling cabs into the poorer neighborhoods (one of which I live in) to rob and then murder the drivers. But it is not reported in the national media. Instead, we have entertainment or “reality” television where everyone is filthy rich and these people, who are a part of the 1% who control 42% of the wealth of this country, constantly remind us that we can become like them also. A mass hypnosis that keeps Americans mesmerized. I can’t wait to read more.

    Reply
  • Man Regina, this piece though brief carries the weight of a novel. What I mean is that it paints a picture of the current Cuban reality with urgency and a grim fervor. Although these are not times to be taken lightly, you my dear have the beginnings of an important investigative narrative, short novel, scenario, or theatrical piece. In America things are very bad esp. for the silent majority (underclass). In my town, a young couple was apprehended for calling cabs into the poorer neighborhoods (one of which I live in) to rob and then murder the drivers and scenes like this are happening daily across the country ignored by the watchful eye of the national news media. Instead, we have entertainment or “reality” television where everyone is filthy rich and these people, who are a part of the 1% of the population that control 42% of the wealth of this country, constantly remind us that we can become like them also. A mass hypnosis that keeps Americans mesmerized. I can’t wait to read more.

    Reply
  • Regina, thanks for a superb but chilling article. How depressing for socialists in the US that socialism in Cuba has come to this!

    One more reason for the PCC to discard the self-destructive model of state monopoly socialism inherited from the old Soviet Union and the Communist Manifesto, and progress to a state participatory model based on the employee-owned cooperatives originating in Mondragon, Spain.

    Reply
  • Moby: Your comments reveal the truth of what’s happening in the U.S. I hope Regina and others in Cuba will understand that Cuba has no monopoly on economic hardship, growing crime or official public opinion formation.

    You also might check out out movement for a socialist Cooperative Republic by 2021.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Photo of the Day

Photo of the Day
Picture 1 of 1

Sunset, Cienfuegos, Cuba.  By Jeff Marot (Canada).  Camera: Huawei P20

Submit your pictures to our Photo of the Day section
You don’t have to be a professional photographer, just send an image (in black and white or color), with a photo caption indicating where it was taken (city and country), type of camera or cell you used, and a small description about it.
Note: it is better for our format if you send horizontal orientation pictures. Even square will work but vertical is a problem.
Send your picture with your name and birth country, or where you reside, to this email address: yordaguer@gmail.com